Deep by Jeff Corwin


Photography images, 30×40″: Why do my landscapes look the way they do? Is it because of where I choose to shoot? Eastern Washington State? Montana? New Mexico I’ve thought a lot about that over the years and my answer is no. My images look the way they do because of what is inside of me. There are a lot of “pretty” landscapes where I go, certainly in Montana. I gravitate to the bleak, lonely, and isolated because of what resonates inside me. It’s what I see, because it’s what I feel. Even as I write this, I feel disturbed saying the words. But when I was about 8 or 9, my mother told me “you’ve always been an old man”. I’m still not sure how to take that at 66. But yes, I’ve always been a “glass half empty” personality. So, I tend towards the emptiness of landscapes, not the glory of mountains and meadows and late afternoon light. I don’t need the last few minutes of the day to make a photograph that clicks. I don’t seek out that emptiness, but after so many years, just react to it. I was told recently that my negativity is a “bummer”. No doubt. For so many reasons, I wish it wasn’t so. But, at this point, what would happen to the imagery I enjoy creating? How would I navigate my approach towards something more typical and those expectedly beautiful images. Would I end up with sparkly, saturated photos? What would happen to the the “glass half empty” stark, tones of my landscapes. I honestly don’t know. Within certain bodies of my work, I’ve attempted to go against my instincts. It’s never worked out.
For me, trust is an extremely important aspect of what I do. I learned long ago to trust my vision and not second guess things like composition or light or content. Photography is, as is many art forms, a reaction to experience, spirit, instinct and that which immediately resonates.

Artist statement
Why do my landscapes look the way they do? Is it because of where I choose to shoot? Eastern Washington State? Montana? New Mexico I’ve thought a lot about that over the years and my answer is no. My images look the way they do because of what is inside of me. There are a lot of “pretty” landscapes where I go, certainly in Montana. I gravitate to the bleak, lonely, and isolated because of what resonates inside me. It’s what I see, because it’s what I feel. Even as I write this, I feel disturbed saying the words. But when I was about 8 or 9, my mother told me “you’ve always been an old man”. I’m still not sure how to take that at 66. But yes, I’ve always been a “glass half empty” personality. So, I tend towards the emptiness of landscapes, not the glory of mountains and meadows and late afternoon light. I don’t need the last few minutes of the day to make a photograph that clicks. I don’t seek out that emptiness, but after so many years, just react to it. I was told recently that my negativity is a “bummer”. No doubt. For so many reasons, I wish it wasn’t so. But, at this point, what would happen to the imagery I enjoy creating? How would I navigate my approach towards something more typical and those expectedly beautiful images. Would I end up with sparkly, saturated photos? What would happen to the the “glass half empty” stark, tones of my landscapes. I honestly don’t know. Within certain bodies of my work, I’ve attempted to go against my instincts. It’s never worked out.
For me, trust is an extremely important aspect of what I do. I learned long ago to trust my vision and not second guess things like composition or light or content. Photography is, as is many art forms, a reaction to experience, spirit, instinct and that which immediatelyresonates.


https://www.jeffcorwinfineart.com

Posted in C19

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